Lovingood Holds Marathon Meetings on Local Issues

Supervisor Robert A. Lovingood, center, speaks on the floor of the California Senate with State Senators Steve Knight, left, and Mike Morrell, right.

Supervisor Robert A. Lovingood, center, speaks on the floor of the California Senate with State Senators Steve Knight, left, and Mike Morrell, right.

 

By Staff Reports

(Victor Valley)– First District Supervisor Robert A. Lovingood met this week with leaders in Sacramento on a wide variety of topics from economic issues to resolving dust and traffic problems at Oak Hills High School.

“We had 10 meetings in six hours and covered a lot of relevant local issues,” Lovingood said. “We made our case, and I am hopeful we’ll see progress.”

In a meeting with Assemblywoman Cheryl Brown of the Inland Empire Legislative Caucus, Lovingood advocated for the High Desert to become a pilot area for a new hiring credit approved by the California Legislature. Businesses would be eligible for tax credits if they hire workers for new positions that pay $10 t0 $28 per hour.

Lovingood also advocated for trial court funding, a greater emphasis on fighting workers compensation fraud and technical job training that focuses on rapid results.

“We need technical job training for good workers stuck in low-wage jobs,” the Supervisor said. “Local control, flexibility and accountability are vital.”

Lovingood also spoke about Assembly Bill 32, which is driving up energy costs for households and businesses. On Jan. 1, 2015, gasoline and other transportation fuels will be subject to the California Air Resources Board’s cap-and-trade program. Gas prices are expected to rise between 15 and 40 cents a gallon because of the AB 32 greenhouse gas regulations. In meetings with various Legislators, Lovingood urged a delay in expanding the cap-and-trade program.

“The economic recovery in California is fragile,” Lovingood said. “It makes no sense to burden families and job creators, especially when we have many people unemployed and under-employed.”

In July, Lovingood met with Hesperia Unified School District Superintendent David McLaughlin to discuss solutions to traffic and dust problems at Oak Hills High School. In talks Wednesday, Lovingood brought up the six-year-old issue with legislators and in a special meeting with senior officials with the California Department of Education.

When Oak Hills High School was built in 2008, San Bernardino County spent over $800,000 to pave El Centro to help alleviate traffic and safety problems. But a lot of traffic to the school is on dirt roads that are not maintained by the county

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