Cemex Awarded Air District’s Highest Honor

 

Pictured (Left to Right): San Bernardino County First District Supervisor Robert Lovingood; John Tomko, Environmental Instrumentation Coordinator, CEMEX; Darlene Bray, Environmental Manager, CEMEX; Alejandra Vargas Silva, Environmental Coordinator, CEMEX; Carlos Uruchurtu, Plant Manager, CEMEX; Brad Poiriez, Executive Director, Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District.

Pictured (Left to Right): San Bernardino County First District Supervisor Robert Lovingood; John Tomko, Environmental Instrumentation Coordinator, CEMEX; Darlene Bray, Environmental Manager, CEMEX; Alejandra Vargas Silva, Environmental Coordinator, CEMEX; Carlos Uruchurtu, Plant Manager, CEMEX; Brad Poiriez, Executive Director, Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District.

By Staff Reports

(Victorville) – Staff from CEMEX’s Victorville Plant commemorated the 100 year anniversary of California’s largest cement producer by accepting the Mojave Desert Air Quality Management District’s 2015/2016 Exemplar Award today, in recognition of implementing energy-cutting measures and renewable energy projects which have dramatically reduced the facility’s carbon-footprint. The Exemplar Award is awarded annually by the local regulatory agency to High Desert entities that demonstrate an exceptional commitment to clean air through the development of voluntary activities that reduce or prevent air pollution emissions.

The centerpiece of the Victorville Plant’s sustainability efforts – four wind turbines that generate a total of 6.2 megawatts of wind energy for the facility – have become a familiar local landmark since their 2013 installation, just off the I-15. The power generated by the zero-emission turbines is sufficient to power over 1,500 average-sized American households per year. Moreover, the turbines prevent more than 11,000 tons of CO2 emissions per year while fulfilling approximately 6% of the facility’s energy needs.

Additional conservation efforts being utilized at CEMEX’s Victorville facility include alternative fuel-handling systems which allow the facility to burn up to 25% alternative fuels; use of limestone additive to decrease clinker factor; improving thermal energy efficiency of its kiln line 1 through process optimization; and active participation in Southern California Edison’s Demand Response Programs during statewide energy demand peak times.

As a result of the facility’s demonstrated commitment to energy efficiency, CEMEX’s Victorville Plant has received the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s prestigious ENERGY STAR certifications for five consecutive years, from 2012 to 2016. ENERGY STAR certified buildings and plants meet strict energy performance standards set by USEPA. They use less energy, are less expensive to operate, and cause fewer greenhouse gas emissions than their peers. CEMEX also promotes ENERGY STAR values and environmental education through their active support of local community organizations such as the Mojave Environmental Education Consortium and Victor Valley College.

“CEMEX has distinguished itself as a leader in the industry’s path toward a more sustainable future,” commented MDAQMD Executive Director Brad Poiriez, adding, “The MDAQMD applauds CEMEX for its commitment to balancing its business operations with the protection of local air quality.” CEMEX Victorville Plant’s Exemplar Award was accepted by Environmental Manager Darlene Bray, Plant Manager Carlos Uruchurtu, Environmental Instrumentation Coordinator John Tomko and Environmental Coordinator Alejandra Silva.

CEMEX’s Victorville Plant has continuously produced Portland and hydraulic cement since it began operation on Labor Day of 1916. The plant produces more than 2.5 million tons of cement annually for use in area homes, roads schools and businesses throughout California, Nevada and Arizona. The MDAQMD is the local air pollution control agency for San Bernardino County’s High Desert region and the Palo Verde Valley portion of Riverside County. The District is responsible for regulating stationary air pollution sources and implementing state and federal air quality rules and regulations within its 20,000-plus square mile jurisdiction, which is home to over 550,000 residents.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *